Jasmina Cibic

  • Date:
    20 July–30 September 2017

Topical Devices

This exhibition represents a concise moment in Jasmina Cibic’s current practice. A distillation of recent research into a specific objective arrangement, it is simultaneously a fragment of a much larger project, and yet complete as an iteration of the whole. At its centre stands that most pervasive figure in art history, the female nude.

Cibic’s films, photographs and installations are often populated by female figures. Sometimes speaking, sometimes mute, they dance, decorate and proclaim, acting as mouthpieces through which intricately researched tracts on the nature of power, aesthetics and statecraft pour forth. These ciphers are always formed by that which they appear to represent, even when the contents of their rhetoric is contradictory and garbled. They follow in the dubious tradition of the allegorical female, descendants of stately mother nations. The certainties of those great ages of nation-building gone, the trace and the archive here replace the sound and the fury in a double-game.

Key to Cibic’s work is her ability to play with fragmentation – highlighting basic ”building blocks”, be it in language, design or architecture, and representing them in isolation. Upon encountering the quarantined fragments, the spectator cannot help but attempt to reconstruct them, to imagine them in their original formation, and in doing so encounter the foundation of ideological and political thought. Each element speaks of its place of origin, and is infused with a variable effective half-life, charged with former ideologies that only deplete in potency over time.

The elements that make up this particular constellation derive their sources from three historical structures. This first is Dragiša Brašovan’s pavilion for the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, built for the occasion of the 1929 Barcelona World Exposition, which according to legend received the first prize at the Exposition. Due to political intrigue it subsequently lost that honour to the German Pavilion and its architect Mies Van der Rohe. The female nude that stands at the centre of this exhibition is taken from the pavilion’s entrance, here remodelled based on fragmentary and incomplete photographic documentation. It replaces the original whilst contradicting it, resurrecting this problematic emblem at the same time as overwriting it.

The second site of reference is the Former Palace of the Federation in Belgrade, from which a tapestry has been co-opted and ‘mass-produced’. As Brašovan’s nude, repurposed and re-contextualized by Cibic stands with the crypto-permanence embodied in its art-historical form, the repetitive facsimiles that background it fade as their historical potency depletes. Elsewhere we see their fixity restored in photographs of the Former Palace, distant in their documentary clarity, yet alluring by way the allegorical females placed in front of them.

The third site is another structure designed to sell Yugoslavia’s European potential. Now a republic, it modeled itself as a leading nation in the Non-Aligned Movement. In Cibic’s film NADA: Act I, Vjenceslav Richer’s original design for the 1958 Brussels World Exposition is realised, complete with its censored spire, albeit in the guise of a musical instrument. Once strung, a variation on Béla Bartók’s Magnificient Mandarin is performed. It was this controversial pantomime ballet that was chosen by the Yugoslav Republic to represent it to the international audience on the Nations’ Day in Brussels.

Gathering together these symbols and iconographies, Cibic’s projects present a synthesis of gesture, stagecraft and re-enactment. Instantiated in films and installations, hers is also an ongoing performative practice, an ‘enacted’ exercise in the dissection of statecraft. Her multilayered approach draws together primary sources and falsified narratives. This willful overwriting creates shifting meanings and highlights historical uncertainties and untruths, especially in the gendering of the past. Cibic plays a double-game, at once decoding mechanisms of power whilst building her own exemplary allegorical structures. Hers is a practice that addresses the ways in which visual language, art, architecture, and rhetoric are deployed and instrumentalised by political regimes, before investigating what happens to these fragments when the ideologies they endorse collapse.

About the artist

Jasmina Cibic’s work is site and context specific, performative in nature and employs a range of activity, media and theatrical tactics to redefine or reconsider an existent environment and its politics. Her work draws a parallel between the construction of national culture and its use value for political aims, encouraging the viewer to consider the timelessness of psychological and soft power mechanisms that authoritarian structures utilise in their own reinsertion and reinvention. The basic gesture in her artistic explorations is the dismantlement and careful analysis of the work of art, its representation, and its relationship to the viewer as she tries to operate inside the system she is investigating.

Cibic represented Slovenia at the 55th Venice Biennial with her project For Our Economy and Culture.

Her recent exhibitions include solo shows at: Aarhus 2017, Esker Foundation Calgary, Museum of Contemporary Art Zagreb, Museum of Contemporary Art Belgrade, Museum of Contemporary Art Vojvodina, MGLC Ljubljana and Ludwig Museum Budapest.

Cibic’s films have been screened at Pula Film Festival, HKW Berlin, CCA Laznia, Les Rencontres Internationales Paris, Dokfest Kassel and Copenhagen International Documentary Festival. In 2016 Jasmina Cibic has been nominated for the Jarman Award and was the winner of the MAC International Ulster Bank and Charlottenborg Fonden awards.

www.jasminacibic.org

Events

Summer Holiday Family Workshop: Re-Pose
Saturday 5 August 2017, 11am–1pm
No artistic skills required! – so why not join artist Louise Clarke to have fun working in a group using the workshop as a laboratory to investigate themes within the current exhibition at NN Contemporary Art by Jasmina Cibic.
We will collaborate to recreate historic figurative art compositions. By striking a pose we can embody a narrative and enhance our understanding of gesture and its political and historical use. We will use silhouettes and montage to visualise figurative groups exploring their potential as blueprints for contemporary statues. And of course, there will be plenty of opportunity to photograph groupings as we go along.
Suitable for ages 8–80; All children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult.
Free admission but booking is essential. Book your free place here.

Work in Progress
19 August 2017, 2–4pm
23 September 2017, 2–4pm
For artists by artists, bring your work in progress for friendly peer critique. WiP is led by Sayed Sattar Hasan and starts with a featured artist presentation before opening the conversation out to the regular peer critique. If you would like to be a future featured artist at WiP, email us at [email protected].
The WiP on 23 September 2017 kicks off #CritDay. This event has been organised in association with the Contemporary Visual Arts Network East Midlands‘s DOCUMENT project. Between 23 and 29 September 2017, artist crit days will be organised in different localities throughout the East Midlands. Search #CritDay.
Follow Northampton’s Work in Progress at #CritDayNorthampton

Bumps & Babes
27 July 2017, 2–3pm
31 August 2017, 2–3pm
28 September 2017, 2–3pm
Get messy with your baby or pre-schooler in these crayon-fuelled, finger painting sessions. Make sure you wear clothes that can handle paint!

In Conversation with Jasmina Cibic
15 September 2017, 7pm
Artist Jasmina Cibic will be in conversation about her current exhibition Topical Devices at NN Contemporary Art. Join us for this special event with the artist followed by drinks to celebrate the exhibition.

Write Club: writing for your website
28 September 2017, 6–7pm
Do you have a website? Join us for a session about writing for your website including tips on search engine optimization, what content to consider and clear communication.

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